RokiJump, the Roku remote that can skip thru commercials now available in the Apple App Store!

‎RokiJump

‎Roki​Jump, the ROKU remote that can skip through commercials! Program a button to fast-forward for a certain amount of time before playing. Skip through one-minute, two-minute, or however long, commercials, sports timeouts, previous-episode rehash, and more. Of course, RokiJump has all of the normal…

My first iOS app is now available in the Apple App Store! RokiJump, the ROKU remote that can skip through commercials! Program a button to fast-forward for a certain amount of time before playing. Skip through one-minute, two-minute, or however long, commercials, sports timeouts, previous-episode rehash, and more. Of course, RokiJump has all of the normal remote functions too, even ones unique to ROKU TV, like power on/off, volume, and mute. You can also instantly select any of the channels you have installed (e.g., Netflix, Amazon Prime, etc.) RokiJump lets you enter text from your device’s keyboard! No more finger Twister when entering text. Just connect your iOS device and ROKU to the same WiFi network.

FEATURES:
*Free version includes a fully-functioning jump button
*No ads in the free version!
*In-app purchase unlocks three additional jump buttons!
*All the standard remote buttons included
*ROKU TV specific buttons (Power on/off, volume up/down, mute)
*ROKU Channels can be launched from app
*Text input using your mobile device keyboard (compatibility app-dependent)
*Automatically finds all ROKU devices on the same network as the mobile device, including Roku 1-3, Streaming Stick, Express, Express+, Premiere, Premiere+, Ultra, ROKU TV, etc.
*Compatible with iPhone and iPad running iOS 13+

ROKU, the ROKU Logo, STREAMING STICK, ROKU TV, ROKU POWERED, the ROKU POWERED Logo, ROKU READY, the ROKU READY Logo, “STOP DREAMING. START STREAMING.”, “HAPPY STREAMING”, “THERE’S A TON OF ENTERTAINMENT IN THIS LITTLE BOX,” and “NOW THIS IS TV” are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of Roku, Inc. in the United States and other countries.

This app has no association with and is not endorsed by Roku, Inc.

Skip through commercials on your Roku with RokiJump!

If you have a ROKU and watch programs with commercials, you will want RokiJump. This iOS app let’s you skip through them!

Home – RokiJump

Roki​Jump A ROKU™ remote that can skip through commercials! RokiJump Doing the seemingly impossible Sadly, the standard ROKU™ remote lacks a skip forward button. However, what if you could program a button to fast-forward for a certain amount of time before playing? You wouldn’t have to guess when to press the play button.

 

 

Stream video files over WiFi to Oculus Go when traveling

Due to the meager storage capacity of the Oculus Go, being able to stream video files over WiFi using a portable device is a real game-changer when traveling away from home. Historically, my portable streaming device of choice was the RAVPower RP-WD04. However, I found streaming the generally larger VR files to be problematic using this device. Fortunately, RAVPower has a new version, the RP-WD09, which handles them nicely. I’ll refer to the device simply as the FileHub. (Make sure you don’t get the RP-WD07 as some significant improvements were made and it looks nearly identical to the RP-WD09.) Read more

Window-mount a Yi Home 2 Camera

Having owned the original Yi Home Camera, I had high expectations when I ordered the Yi Home 2 Camera. It’s version 2…it HAD to be better, right? I was really looking forward to the wider 130-degree lens. However, once I got it, I was very disappointed that Yi changed the base and the Home 2 camera can’t be freely rotated like the original. This made window-mounting the Home 2 much more problematic. Argh! Read more

Shutdown Windows computer and Synology NAS using WinNut

Previously, my Windows PC happily send a command to my Synology NAS to shutdown when the UPS (connected to my PC) was running low on battery power. (See my post, “Shutdown Windows computer and Synology NAS using CyberPower UPS“) Things came to a grinding halt when DSM 6 was released and eliminated remote access by the root user…probably a good thing security-wise, of course.

After much research, I discovered the Network UPS Tools (NUT) project. Included in its goals is uniform control and management of UPSs and it seems manufacturers, including Synology, have embraced the “standard”. It’s a server-client model where you connect the UPS to the Synology NAS, the server (aka master), and run a monitoring program on your PC, the client (aka slave), to shut it down when the UPS battery power gets low.

Setup on the NAS side, is as easy as checking a couple option boxes. It’s not so straight forward on the client side of things. I found at least three different Windows client applications, all with less than clear configuration instructions. I settled on WinNUT, but lost patience trying to figure out how to configure the new version and opted for the older one which still seems to work under Windows 10. Read more

Ring Doorbell Windows 10 Volume Problem Solved!

Whenever I ran the Ring Doorbell Windows app, it would always lower the volume on any other application (music, video, etc.) that was running. As soon as I closed the Live View, the volume on the other apps would return to normal. I contacted their support and was told that it could be a driver issue. Obviously, they didn’t really know why it was happening.

Well, I did some more digging and discovered that in the Sounds dialog, there is a Communications tab. By default, the “When Windows detects communications activity” option was set to “Reduce the volume of other sounds by 80%”. That sure sounded like what was happening, so I changed it to “Do nothing”. BINGO! That fixed it!

I never even knew that setting existed. To get to the Sounds dialog, click the Windows icon on your desktop to bring up the menu. Type Sound and it will appear. It will say Control Panel underneath.

I’m not sure if other versions of Windows do the same thing, but I wouldn’t be surprised. Good luck!

Remote into a high-end gaming-level Windows 10 machine for $35 a month

I’ve been intrigued by the idea of remoting into a cloud-based computer for years. Historically, it’s been expensive and the machines were limited in CPU power, RAM and storage. A french company called Blade is changing this with their Shadow service. For $35 a month, you get remote access to an Intel Xeon processor with eight dedicated threads, 12GB of DDR4 memory, 256GB of storage and NVidia GTX 1080 equivalent graphics. What’s really cool is that the hardware evolves and automatically upgrades. You don’t have to keep upgrading your computer!

You can remote in from your computer or mobile device (Windows, Mac and Android available now, iOS coming soon) and the minimum bandwidth is just 5Mbps. That will get you 720p at 60 fps. Faster connections will get you up to 4k resolution. (Note: Dual screens are not yet supported but will be in the future according to the FAQ.) Keep in mind that your local bandwidth is only used for display and remote control, the host computer has a 1Gb per second Internet connection!

Although it’s billed as a gaming service, it’s still just a Windows 10 machine so you could use it as an everyday computer as well. The question I have is how it will work with local storage which will be essential for resource intensive work like video and graphics editing.

$35 a month may seem steep, but it’s a lot cheaper than buying a similarly spec’d PC. Also, in lieu of using your own PC, you can also buy their Shadow Box for $139.95 or $9.95 per month to rent.

Check their website for availability. The west coast is already up and the east coast is scheduled for August 9. Look for a nationwide rollout by October.

A Service that Lets You Use Windows 10 on Any Computer or Phone Is Going Nationwide

Back at CES in January, French company Blade seemed to promise the moon. For a monthly fee, the company would give users access to a high-end Windows 10 machine, with the latest CPU from Intel and a beefy Nvidia 1080 GPU built in.

Atari origins

Interesting article discussing the origins of Atari. I remember bringing home my Pong game console purchased from Sears where I worked and playing it with my brother James all night. I am definitely going to read “Valley of Genius: The Uncensored History of Silicon Valley (As Told by the Hackers, Founders, and Freaks Who Made It Boom)” by Adam Fisher when it comes out.

https://medium.com/s/story/ataris-hard-partying-origin-story-an-oral-history-c438b0ce9440