ASUS RT-AC88U WiFi and AirPrint wireless printer problem solution

The ASUS RT-AC88U is a pretty awesome router. However, out of the box, it’s a bit finicky if you try to print to it via WiFi or Apple’s AirPrint. It doesn’t seem to want to maintain the connection. I stumbled across this somewhat cryptic post and the suggested changes have solved my issues–at least so far. Here are the steps with a little more detail:

1. First log into the router’s settings.

2. Choose Wireless > Professional tab

3. Make the following changes:

-Modulation Scheme: Up to MCS 9 (802.11ac)
-Airtime Fairness: Disable
-Multi-User MIMO: Disable (Note that this was already disabled by default for me)
-Explicit Beamforming: Disable
-Universal Beamforming (5 GHz only): Disable

Click Apply button.

4. Each of the Bands (i.e., 2.4GHz and 5GHz) have their own independent set of settings on this page. So, change the Band and repeat Step 3.

5. Finally, change the Control Channel to a specific channel (i.e., something other than Auto). Again, apply the change for one band, change the Band setting, and apply the change for the other band.

 

I’m not sure what real-world impact changing these settings has on the router’s performance; however, I haven’t really noticed any significant difference…other than my printer works wireless now ;-)

 

The Rolls SL33B – An awesome compressor/limiter for PC audio!

I’ve found that online video is REALLY inconsistent in terms of audio volume, particularly advertisements that are inserted into streaming programs. I knew I needed some sort of compressor/limiter to automatically reduce loud sounds and amplify quieter sounds, creating a more uniform volume level overall. I had hoped to find a simple software solution, but was surprised that nothing good really exists. Switching my search to a hardware solution, I stumbled upon the Rolls SL33B Stereo Program Limiter.

The SL33B is designed specifically for consumer-level equipment and keeps things simple with only two controls. One control sets the threshold, that is, the level at which the signal will be processed. The other is Makeup Gain which controls the volume after the signal is processed–basically an output volume control.

The SL33B has both RCA and 1/8″ input/output connectors so it’s perfect for a PC set-up. It’s housed in a small but rugged metal box and requires a typical AC adapter. It would also be quite suitable for a TV *if* you used external amplification/speakers and not the TV’s built-in speakers.

I love this little gem for its simplicity in connections and controls. It’s also great for movies which often have audio levels all over the place. The only thing I wish it had was a bypass switch for listening to music, since you typically don’t want to mess with the dynamic range of music. However, since I don’t typically listen to music on my PC, this is not a deal breaker. So far, the SL33B has really been the answer to my prayers!

Getting Flash to run in Chrome

Despite the movement to kill it, Flash is still used by many sites. For me, Flash is particularly problematic when using Chrome. If you are having problems playing video and aren’t sure if Flash is the culprit, check the right side of the address box and look for an icon with a red X. Click it and a pop-up box will appear giving you the option to temporarily Run all plugins this time. Clicking that option should temporarily fix the Flash issue on that page.

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